Types Of Ringworms And Their Health Effects

Ringworms are of different types, and each one has different symptoms and leaves a red and itchy spot. http://ringwormtreatmentsblog.com/8-different-types-ringworm/ talks about eight different kinds of ringworm. The worm can cause infection and can lead to health hazards, but we can find many sites online providing resources on the symptoms and treatments for ringworm infection check it out.

Tinea corporis: This type of ringworm affects the arms and legs and is the most common type of ringworm. The symptoms include red spots, circular spots, itchiness, and scales. The spots can have hair follicles, lesions similar to blisters results in nodules and pustules.

Tinea cruris: It is also known as jock itch, the ringworm leaves reddish-brown rashes and emanates from the groin folds and spreads on both thighs, this type of ringworm should not be confused with intertrigo, caused due to the result of chafed skin. The rashes develop in the groin area, and it is important to consult a physician before undergoing any treatment.

Tinea barbae: Commonly called barber’s itch the ringworm impacts the hair on the face. Some of the symptoms may be red skin, crusting and lumpy pustules formed around the facial hair. The fungi are responsible for tinea barbae and T. mentagrophytes (found in horses) and T.verrucosum (found on cattle). The ringworm affects farmers as they breed in cattle and horses.

Tinea manuum: The ringworm affect either of the hands, the symptoms include elevated circular spots. The infection is contagious and can be transmitted from other infected regions. It can be transmitted from animals like cat, cattle, dogs or hedgehogs and even from infected soil.

Tinea faciei: This type of infection is prominently seen on the face but not on the scalp or facial hair regions. These are oval or round spots that are red and scaly. This could spread due to accidental scratching particularly with fungi infected fingernails. Differentiating between atopic dermatitis, rosacea and psoriasis are, important. It is important to identify the cause of the infection before choosing a treatment.

Tinea pedis: The ringworm can affect one or both foot and hence aptly called athlete’s foot. The worm grows in moisture, and people who are prone to feet sweat are vulnerable to this type of infection. Some of the symptoms include irritation, peeling of the skin particularly in the gap between the last two toe fingers, blisters and dry patches on top of the feet. It is common in children and is also found in adults who participate in sports activities.

Tinea capitis: The infection is found in the scalp particularly in children and at times in adults. The symptoms are scaly spots, itchiness, black dots with hair emanating from it and skin spots. Once you find these symptoms, it is time to call upon a doctor. Sometimes the spots can lead to baldness and scarring.

Tinea unguium: The ringworm affects the fingernails and is called onychomycosis. It causes the nails to turn yellow, crumbly and thick. It is vital to have the condition checked at times it can be mistaken to be nail disorder like lichen planus, psoriasis, and eczema.

Tinea incognito: It occurs only if the person already has any of the above conditions. It may be a result of the mistaken diagnosis.

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